The neurological emergence of epilepsy the National Hospital for the Paralysed and Epileptic (1870-1895) /

This book explores the emergence of epilepsy as a purely neurological disorder, in the second half of the nineteenth century. It focuses on the world's first neurological hospital, the National Hospital for the Paralysed and Epileptic in London, and on its leading figure, John Hughlings Jackson...

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Main Author: Lekka, Vasia, 1981-
Other Authors: SpringerLink (Online Service)
Format: eBook
Language: English
Published: Cham ; New York : Springer, [2014]
Physical Description: 1 online resource : illustrations (some color)
Series: Boston studies in the philosophy and history of science ; v. 305.
Subjects:
Summary: This book explores the emergence of epilepsy as a purely neurological disorder, in the second half of the nineteenth century. It focuses on the world's first neurological hospital, the National Hospital for the Paralysed and Epileptic in London, and on its leading figure, John Hughlings Jackson (1835-1911). Through an analysis of the National Hospital's medical records and a historical account of the course of epilepsy until our time, this book presents the nineteenth-century turn towards the scientific study of the human brain and the various political, social, ideological and epistemological.
Item Description: Includes bibliographical references.
Preface; I On a History of Epilepsy; II Outline of the Chapters; Acknowledgments; Contents; Chapter 1: Introduction; 1.1 The Story of a Picture; 1.2 Epilepsy Today; 1.3 Some Thoughts Concerning Methodology; References; Chapter 2: "Bodies That Matter": Living in the Nineteenth Century; 2.1 Introduction; 2.2 Living in the Nineteenth Century; 2.3 "Bodies That Matter"; 2.4 Epilepsy and Epileptics up to the Nineteenth Century; References; Chapter 3: Unrolling the Archives' Thread: Epilepsy and Epileptics at the National Hospital for the Paralysed and Epileptic.
3.1 The Foundation of the National Hospital for the Paralysed and Epileptic3.2 1870-1879; 3.3 1880-1885; 3.4 1886-1890; 3.5 1891-1895; 3.6 The 'National Society for the Employment of Epileptics'; References; Chapter 4: Discovering Epilepsy and Epileptics in Victorian London; 4.1 Introduction; 4.2 Epileptic Patients' Gender; 4.3 Epileptic Patients' Age; 4.4 Epileptic Patients' Marital Status; 4.5 Epileptic Patients' Occupation; 4.6 Epileptic Patients' Address of Residence; 4.7 Epileptic Patients' Lived Experience; 4.8 Towards a Sociology of Epilepsy and Epileptics; References.
Chapter 5: Epilepsy in the Age of Neurology5.1 Introduction; 5.2 Entering the National Hospital; 5.3 Staying at the National Hospital; 5.4 Curing the Epileptic Body; 5.5 Exiting the National Hospital; 5.6 Examining the Epileptic Body; 5.7 Turning the Gaze to the Human Body; 5.8 Introducing a New Physiology of the Human Brain; 5.9 Putting the Population Under the Microscope; References; Chapter 6: Towards the Twenty-First Century; 6.1 Introduction; 6.2 Epilepsy in the Twentieth Century; 6.3 Epileptic Patients in the Twentieth Century; 6.4 Towards the Twenty-First Century; References; Epilogue.
This book explores the emergence of epilepsy as a purely neurological disorder, in the second half of the nineteenth century. It focuses on the world's first neurological hospital, the National Hospital for the Paralysed and Epileptic in London, and on its leading figure, John Hughlings Jackson (1835-1911). Through an analysis of the National Hospital's medical records and a historical account of the course of epilepsy until our time, this book presents the nineteenth-century turn towards the scientific study of the human brain and the various political, social, ideological and epistemological.
Physical Description: 1 online resource : illustrations (some color)
Bibliography: Includes bibliographical references.
ISBN: 9783319062938
331906293X